Little Labs Vog

productSome people might not even consider the Little Labs Voice Of God to be an EQ unit in the strictest sense of the term, but we think it deserves inclusion for the way it helps solve one of the most common problems faced when EQing low-frequency instruments: how to boost the the low end without muddying up the bottom of the mix.

The VOG is essentially a resonant high-pass filter, but describing it that way might suggest it’s designed to be used as a creative effect. That’s not the case; you’re not supposed to sweep the frequency while the track plays or use it like you’d use a filter on a synth. Instead, think of it in EQ terms: it works like a peak filter which can be used to apply a very narrow-bandwidth boost to an adjustable frequency range centred between 20 and 300 Hz. At the same time, frequencies below that peak are rolled off with a steep slope.

The Voice Of God name comes from the fact that the unit was originally designed to replicate the proximity effect of a directional microphone when recording and mixing vocals, but it works so well on other sources that you’re just as likely to find a use for it on bass, kick drums or even snares as you are on vocals.

The VOG’s simplicity is its main advantage. Forget trying to set up a pair of complimentary peak and high-pass filters to tweak the low end of a signal. In fact, forget frequencies, bandwidths and gain amounts altogether and use your ears. With just two knobs (plus a couple of buttons to adjust the range of the frequency control), this is a unit which really encourages you to listen to what’s going on and focus in on the key frequencies of the signal.

The VOG is simple, obvious and so effective. It’s a one-of-a-kind tool which does its job with the minimum of fuss. Universal Audio’s official emulation provides the software option.

27th February, 2014

Comments

  • I love you all.

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  • You missed KUSH! for higher, simply the best.

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  • PS I dot think you acknowledged that precision cuts are a different ballgame to those beautiful wide sweeps. Different tool.s.

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  • for me, Pultec for bass. Cambridge for tight cuts. and natives for gentleness. If that makes sense. Either way, keep up the good work.

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  • Maag?

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  • The most important Eq curve for dance music is the 24 or preferably 48 dB/Oct slope highpass filter. It allows producers with even average abilities to create low end and low mids that are complex and layered yet intelligible. Most producers I know have an Eq doing just this on good percentage of the tracks in every song. I’d say that for and EQ to truly be the EQ of dance music it would need to be able to not only do this but be available to do it on 10 or more (usually more) stereo tracks at the same time. This is where the humble native EQ in most daws shines with its low DSP rent high flexibility. It might not be the most glamorous or best sounding EQ but it might do more for the bass than even a pair of hardware pultec or even a gaggle of dsp pultecs. Add in its pre and post internal spectrum analyzer and it seems pretty amazing.

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  • I Love the IK Pulteq, it just makes most things sound better. Too easy to get carried away with it though.

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  • Just some notes on availability of these EQs as emulations. Both the API 500 series and Sonnox Oxford have officially licenced plug-in versions from Universal Audio.

    http://www.uaudio.com/store/equalizers/api-500-series-eq-collection.html
    http://www.uaudio.com/store/equalizers/oxford-eq.html

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  • KEEP up the phenomenal work guys!

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  • I own a clariphonic myself, and I don’t think there’s a better eq to focus and lift the highs on your 2-buss. Personally, I’m getting ready to sell my SSL E-series EQs so that I can pickup an Electra from Kush…

    He’s doing it right.

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  • Awesome magazne with loads of very useful tricks and insights for the general producing general producers that just don’t have the means to approach music with real world professional knowledge. Very grateful and wish you a continuesly sucessful and quality ensured publication of such! 100% support :)

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  • Um how there is no baxendall eq here is just beyond me. The most used and useful eq of all time. Didn’t get a look in.

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  • Kush isn’t a secret anymore, the word is out. The best, most intuitive and creative EQ and Compressor I’ve ever used. Slow to upgrade completely to AAX, but worth the wait.

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  • Oh .. I love SSL EQ man ! its the amazing shit u can ever get 😀

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  • what about the millennia NSEQ-2, the GML 8200 and Maselec Mea 2 ? (there’s also the Crane IBIS)

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  • That mackie EQ is fucking shite, I can’t believe you put that next to the SSL, which is the mutt’s nuts.

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  • I use the 5500 in my mastering rig everyday. It’s stellar for fast program, passes every transient perfectly. Big bold sound. Not what I would call transparent but perfect for electronic music.

    Will Brodeur
    lacquer channel mastering.

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  • Elysia Xpressor is one notable absence from this list… the Elysia stuff is practically made for electronic music, so clean and precise.

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  • So why you not tell anything about NEVE EQ’s?

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